Headijng out across the shingle to look for fungi in the different habitas that occur on the point at Dungeness.
Some specialised plants have learnt to live on the shingle. Some fungi use these plants as sources of food and shelter.
DSC_7280
DSC_7281
DSC_7282
There are still a few insects taking advantage of the late autumn sunshine.
DSC_7284
Wod Blewitt
DSC_7286
This is the first time this fungi has been found here. It is one of the puffball types.
It's size varies but the largest one is 16cm across.
DSC_7291
DSC_7292
DSC_7294
Dragon basking in the sun.
One of the Long pits, This gives a good indication of the water levels.
DSC_7297
DSC_7298
DSC_7299
DSC_7301
DSC_7302
DSC_7303
A russulas - look at the colour of the cap.
DSC_7305
DSC_7306
DSC_7307
DSC_7308
This raised bed is what is left of the railway line that removed shingle through the last century. This is one of the small Aspen copses.
DSC_7310
DSC_7311
DSC_7312
DSC_7313
DSC_7315
DSC_7316
DSC_7317
On the edge of the willow scrub is an area known as the desert.
DSC_7319
DSC_7320
DSC_7321
This is one half of a huge ring.
As well as fungi on the ground some fungi grow on tree bark. This  is known as an oyster mushroom.
DSC_7324
The top of this fungi collapses and disappears and the spores get blown about.
DSC_7327
DSC_7330
DSC_7332
A Red Admiral finds the willow a good place to sunbathe.
DSC_7336
DSC_7337
DSC_7338
This is another bracket fungus, growing on a branch of the willow.
There are a few birches in the area which host the Fly Agaric. There were 15 around these trees.
DSC_7341
DSC_7343
DSC_7344
DSC_7346
DSC_7347
DSC_7348
Back to the Bird Observatory for a welcome cup of tea.
Dungeness fungi
Gholly
Author: Gholly (ID: 3129)
Posted: 2009-11-04 21:46 GMT+00:00
Mileage: 1.90 km
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Tags: Photography
Views: 1813
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DSC_7278
Headijng out across the shingle to look for fungi in the different habitas that occur on the point at Dungeness.
DSC_7279
Some specialised plants have learnt to live on the shingle. Some fungi use these plants as sources of food and shelter.
DSC_7280
DSC_7281
DSC_7282
DSC_7283
There are still a few insects taking advantage of the late autumn sunshine.
DSC_7284
DSC_7285
Wod Blewitt
DSC_7286
DSC_7287
This is the first time this fungi has been found here. It is one of the puffball types.
DSC_7290
It's size varies but the largest one is 16cm across.
DSC_7291
DSC_7292
DSC_7294
DSC_7295
Dragon basking in the sun.
DSC_7296
One of the Long pits, This gives a good indication of the water levels.
DSC_7297
DSC_7298
DSC_7299
DSC_7301
DSC_7302
DSC_7303
DSC_7304
A russulas - look at the colour of the cap.
DSC_7305
DSC_7306
DSC_7307
DSC_7308
DSC_7309
This raised bed is what is left of the railway line that removed shingle through the last century. This is one of the small Aspen copses.
DSC_7310
DSC_7311
DSC_7312
DSC_7313
DSC_7315
DSC_7316
DSC_7317
DSC_7318
On the edge of the willow scrub is an area known as the desert.
DSC_7319
DSC_7320
DSC_7321
DSC_7322
This is one half of a huge ring.
DSC_7323
As well as fungi on the ground some fungi grow on tree bark. This is known as an oyster mushroom.
DSC_7324
DSC_7325
The top of this fungi collapses and disappears and the spores get blown about.
DSC_7327
DSC_7330
DSC_7332
DSC_7334
A Red Admiral finds the willow a good place to sunbathe.
DSC_7336
DSC_7337
DSC_7338
DSC_7339
This is another bracket fungus, growing on a branch of the willow.
DSC_7340
There are a few birches in the area which host the Fly Agaric. There were 15 around these trees.
DSC_7341
DSC_7343
DSC_7344
DSC_7346
DSC_7347
DSC_7348
DSC_7277
Back to the Bird Observatory for a welcome cup of tea.
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